Meniscus Surgery

Meniscus surgery

Partial meniscectomy mid-term results and attractive scientific surgical solutions of meniscal suturing and  meniscal transplantation arthroscopically, are an area of ​​ scientific consideration and surgical experience exchange  among leading in the field of Sports Medicine Orthopaedic Surgeons in most of  international conferences in Sports Injuries.

Partial removal of the meniscus arthroscopically, although it is now the most common surgery in Sports Injuries, is often accompanied by frequent complications postoperatively, with constant pain and knee effusion to be the more devastating complaints , as a result of degenerative arthritis, since meniscectomy means that we remove knee’s absorber.

The larger portion of the meniscus is removed during arthroscopy, the sooner the symptoms appear in the patient.

In the literature, it appears that more than 60% of meniscal tears are  treated with partial or subtotal meniscectomy  worldwide and over 700,000 patients per year undergo meniscectomy in the US.

The corresponding number of such interventions in Greece is estimated to be beyond  6000-7000 patients  per year.

Although meniscectomy is a relatively simple arthroscopic procedure, it requires a lot of surgical experience, as it appears that more than 65% of these patients show early arthritic lesions that eventually result in the application of an artificial knee in the near future

Familiarity with arthroscopic tools and improved arthroscopic systems and techniques for menisci suturing, in the last decade, has made a “revolution” in arthroscopic surgery and offer patients an additional solution to their problem.

The new technology is not applicable in all cases, but only when the meniscus tear is the “red zone ” where the blood supply and the quality of menisci material is sufficient for suturing.

In all other cases, where the rupture of the meniscus is large or complex and the patient is in middle or old age, these techniques do not apply and meniscectomy leaves large deficits of the meniscus with the ultimate result of arthritis in the knee.

This problem “gave birth”  to the “meniscus transplantation. Early interventions of this type were applied to athletes who had suffered a subtotal meniscectomy in the past and included replacing the lost tissue with human allograft from Tissue Banks.

Very good primary clinical and radiological results led the researchers to find relevant solution in cases where only part of the meniscus (over 25% of total surface) had been removed.

This problem “gave birth”  to the “meniscus transplantation. Early interventions of this type were applied to athletes who had suffered a subtotal meniscectomy in the past and included replacing the lost tissue with human allograft from Tissue Banks.

Very good primary clinical and radiological results led the researchers to find relevant solution in cases where only part of the meniscus (over 25% of total surface) had been removed.

New “biological meniscal scaffolds ” are now on the market and into the hands of the modern Greek Orthopaedic Surgeons with good primary clinical results. These materials are porous, gradually absorbable  and mimic the shape t of normal meniscus, either medial or lateral.

They present  a high mechanical strength in the early implantation stage can be placed fully arthroscopically, can be resized equally to that removed meniscal part and helps the regeneration of the meniscus giving  properties similar to normal.

The method is has a large target group and applies to patient population between 15 and 65 year old,  with profound meniscal damage, or subtotal meniscectomy with continuous postoperative pain, without ligamentous instability or late stage of arthritis.

It is  prohibited in patients who can not follow the strict postoperative rehabilitation protocol.  Complications are minimal and are not different from those of a simple arthroscopy. The hospitalization time  is only one day and the cost of materials is covered by the insurance funds.

Dr. Alevrogiannis can assess your condition and condition, either in his office or at the Metropolitan General.